PARI MAHAL

Pari Mahal, meaning 'house of fairies' in Srinagar is a majestic historic monument that is located above the alluring Chashma Shahi Gardens. A short drive further, along a spur of the Zaberwan Hill, lie the six massive terraces of Pari Mahal (also known as Quntilon), with wonderful views. This age old monument displays the architectural brilliance of the medieval times. A vast and beautiful garden surrounds this structure.

Srinagar witnesses a large number of tourists throughout the year. From all over the world travellers consider this beautiful valley asa paradise. The sightseeing in the Srinagar is an incredible experience. There are beautiful lakes, charming sceneries, ancient monuments that add to the beauty of this place. Out of all the monuments in Srinagar, Parimahalwhich was a royal observatory in the former times has a special significance among thetourists. PariMahal is located at 5 minutes’ drive from CheshmaShahi, the smallest Mughal Garden in Srinagar.

PariMahal, literally meaning The Fairies' Abode is a beautiful seven terraced garden that overlooks the striking city of Srinagar from the top of the Zabarwan mountain range. The garden is located towards the South-west of the famous Dal Lake. PariMahal belongs to the Mughal period hence its architecture portrays the beautiful Islamic architecture that was one of the patronages during the rule of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan.

The architecture of the garden includes a small spring, surrounded by outlandish flowers and ornamental plants arranged out in terraces vanquished by the remains of the exquisite building. The monument is lightened during the night and the magnificent view of the illumed building at the top of the hill can be viewed from most of the places in Srinagar. This splendid monument reveals the grandeur of the taste of the Mughal emperors. The ruins of the building still showcase the rich history of the Mughal period. Nonetheless it is one of the most to visit places in Srinagar.

Pari Mahal also known as the 'House of Fairies', is also popularly called as 'Quntilon'.Located at a distance of ten kilometers from the city Centre, the building has a beautiful lawn with a spring in between. The sight had some ruins of a Budhhist Monastery before mid-1600s. Later the Mughal prince PrinceDaraShikohhad established this beautiful architecture at the same sight.

History
On the remains of a Buddhist moanastery, this garden was established in the mid-1600s by the DaraShikoh who was the sun of the great Mughal emperor ShahJahan. This garden was built by Dara following the orders Sufi Islam. He built it for his tutor and later it was used as an observatory for teaching astronomy and astrology. The garden is now the property of the Government of Srinagar.

Architecture
The garden is located to the southwest of the famous Dal lake on a hill top. The length and breadth of the garden is 122 meters and 62.5 meters respectively. The garden has six terraces and there are no water cascades in the garden as other Mughal gardens usually have. The water tanks of the garden are placed separately on the terraces of the garden and underground pipes are used to fill these tanks. Many beautiful ornamental plants flowers and fruit trees are grown in the garden with a spring flowing in between.

Architecturally, the third terrace of the garden has been constructed in a very interesting manner. The garden has a typical Mughal style entrance that has an arch in its front followed by a dome and a central chamber. The entrance of the garden is located amidst the east wall. It is finely coated with the beautiful paint and plaster. There is a series of large expansive rooms on either side of the entrance. One room towards the north of the entrance is considered to be the hammam or the royal bathing space. Pieces of water pipes can be seen coming out from the domed ceiling of this room and it has a very well decorated interior. There are two chambers towards the south of the entrance. But the purpose of these chambers could not be depicted. Pipes are inserted in the ceilings of these chambers. There is a possibility that the second chamber might have been used as a kitchen as it has two pipes inserted at the ceiling.